Articles upon articles have been written about the “gig economy.” If you’re not au fait with the term, don’t worry- its been slow to catch on, but soon it’ll be ubiquitous.

What is the gig economy?

It used to be that only musicians and artists looked for gigs. The rest of us had full-time jobs that paid salaries, gave us annual leave and helped us plan for a stable future. As salaries have plateaued against inflation and workers’ benefits have diminished across many businesses, more and more people have left full-time employment in search of numerous “gigs.” This kind of employment is flexible, and allows the worker to enjoy varied experiences across multiple clients and even client bases. Uber and Airbnb aren’t the only examples of gigs available in this kind of economy. The influx of makers on Etsy, the freelancers on oDesk and, yes, all the people here at Wordsmithie are examples, too. (And I wouldn’t want to forget the musicians and artists who have embraced this small-scale entrepreneurship all along!)

Is Wordsmithie part of the gig economy?

Wordsmithie engages with multi-passionate industry experts. Every one of our team has deep experience in writing, strategy, marketing or design, but has often left full-time employment. Many of our team have done so to gain experience working on different projects with numerous clients, consulting on their own or as part of a small team. Other have done so to work on personal projects, or unrelated professional passions; we have an urban hiker, transformational coach and a yoga teacher amongst our ranks.

The gig economy is just taking off. We at Wordsmithie are proud to be part of this movement of small-scale entrepreneurship that enables individuals to excel professionally while having the flexibility to pursue their other personal and professional passions.

Khaleelah Jones

Khaleelah Jones is a digital marketing consultant who has worked with tech startups, educational institutions and non-profits on acquisition and engagement strategy, implementation and KPI modeling. When she’s not working, she can be found reading, writing, pontificating history, yoga-ing and making up verbs.
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